Nicholas Hanning

From LEO Ratings

leoratings.com is celebrating our 1-year anniversary of researching incidents involving law enforcement officers in the U.S. We've reported on 277 incidents involving 338 officers from 195 agencies in 42 states. Please help us by following, liking, commenting, retweeting/sharing, and telling a friend to spread the word!

Service Record

Agency                   Park County Colorado Sheriff's Office                
Agency Idaho Springs Colorado Police Department
Rank Officer
Dates of Service Hired October 2, 2017[1]. Ended July 25, 2021.[2]
Salary $53,571 (2020)[3]
Last Known Status Terminated[2]

Incident Reports

Nicholas Hanning.PNG

2013 Arrest of Richard Kahn

On April 28, 2013, Hanning and Deputy Tyson Kinzle responded to a trespassing complaint about Kahn. Kahn claimed that Hanning entered his home without permission, didn't identify himself, and didn't state his reason for being there. The 71-year-old Kahn claimed that Hanning threw him to the ground, resulting in a broken rib.[4]

Hanning's version differs considerably, stating that he met Kahn outside and chased Kahn into the house, where a struggle occurred and Hanning kneed Kahn in the mid-section causing him to fall to the ground.[4]

Kahn was arrested and criminal charges were filed against him.[4]

Department Response

An internal investigation concluded that the use of force was legal, but that the deputies needed more training around tactics and less-than-lethal tools.[4]

2021 Arrest of Michael Clark

On May 30, 2021, Hanning and Officer Ellie Summers responded to a report that 75-year-old Clark had assaulted a neighbor over a noise complaint. The officers went to Clark's apartment and were discussing the incident when Hanning fired a taser at Clark. The incident was recorded on body-worn cameras from both officers.[2][5]

Department Response

On July 25, 2021, Hanning was fired by the department.[2]

Legal Action

On July 21, 2021, Hanning was charged with third-degree assault.[6]

On July 26, 2021, Clark filed a Federal civil rights lawsuit against both officers and the department, alleging the use of excessive force in violation of the Fourth Amendment and other claims. Officer Richard Sonnenberg was also named for failing to properly train the officers and to allow the officers to continue working, despite histories of complaints against them.[7][8]

On December 8, 2021, Hanning pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor third-degree assault charge, which carries a maximum sentence of 18 months in prison and a $100,000 fine. Hanning also resigned his police certification, making him ineligible to work as law enforcement officer in the state. [2]

References